19th Century British Painting

A striking painting conveying a sense of dynamic energy of a section in Windsor Great Park famous for its ancient and towering Oak trees, several of which are more than 1,000 years old. Inspired and influenced by the work of Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Susan Levinson exemplifies the naturalistic treatment that Corot explored at Barbizon in 832: Painting directly from nature - capturing nature the way the artist saw and felt with emphasis on light and a romantic respect for details. 

Dominated by energetic brushstrokes, Levinson expressively breathes life into the canvas, rendering the proud majesty of the old tress with splendor and vitality. Using an extraordinary array of greens hues and earth tones, amplified with looser brushstrokes to create an intense depth of color and a complex interplay of light and shade, Levinson adeptly captures the effect of light and atmosphere, which breaks through the dark of the scene, thereby insects the composition and draws attention to the center of the painting. 

 

Vigorous and precise, this scene of massive and twisted trunks lit up by sunlight, conveying a sense of their vitality and expansiveness. The trees themselves become the focus of the painting, celebrating them as symbols of power, persistence, and beauty. Leviinson, like Jean-Baptiste Corot conveyed a sense of the vitality and expansiveness. The figure to the right in a small patch of sunlight is easily overlook, suggesting the human presence as transitory and minor among the ancient and imposing trees. 

Windsor Great Park Painting .JPG